Your Allies in Alloys for over 50 Years

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2012

Rhenium is one of the rarest elements in Earth's crust with an average concentration of 1 ppb;[21] other sources quote the number of 0.5 ppb making it the 77th most abundant element in Earth's crust.[28] Rhenium is probably not found free in nature (its possible natural occurrence is uncertain), but occurs in amounts up to 0.2%[21] in the mineral molybdenite (which is primarily molybdenum disulfide), the major commercial source, although single molybdenite samples with up to 1.88% have been found.[29] Chile has the world's largest rhenium reserves, part of the copper ore deposits, and was the leading producer as of 2005.[30] It was only recently that the first rhenium mineral was found and described (in 1994), a rhenium sulfide mineral (ReS2) condensing from a fumarole on Russia's Kudriavy volcano, Iturup island, in the Kurile Islands.[31] Kudryavy discharges up to 20–60 kg rhenium per year mostly in the form of rhenium disulfide.[32][33] Named rheniite, this rare mineral commands high prices among collectors.. Commercial rhenium is extracted from molybdenum roaster-flue gas obtained from copper-sulfide ores. Some molybdenum ores contain 0.001% to 0.2% rhenium.[21][29] Rhenium(VII) oxide and perrhenic acid readily dissolve in water; they are leached from flue dusts and gasses and extracted by precipitating with potassium or ammonium chloride as the perrhenate salts, and purified by recrystallization.[21] Total world production is between 40 and 50 tons/year; the main producers are in Chile, the United States, Peru, and Poland.[35] Recycling of used Pt-Re catalyst and special alloys allow the recovery of another 10 tons per year. Prices for the metal rose rapidly in early 2008, from $1000–$2000 per kg in 2003–2006 to over $10,000 in February 2008.[36][37] The metal form is prepared by reducing ammonium perrhenate with hydrogen at high temperatures:[20Applications[edit]

 

 

The Pratt & Whitney F-100 engine uses rhenium-containing second-generation superalloys

Rhenium is added to high-temperature superalloys that are used to make jet engine parts, using 70% of the worldwide rhenium production.[38] Another major application is in platinum-rhenium catalysts, which are primarily used in making lead-free, high-octane gasoline.[39]

 

Alloys[edit]

 

The nickel-based superalloys have improved creep strength with the addition of rhenium. The alloys normally contain 3% or 6% of rhenium.[40] Second generation alloys contain 3%; these alloys were used in the engines of the F-16 and F-15, while the newer single-crystal third generation alloys contain 6% of rhenium; they are used in the F-22 and F-35 engines.[39][41] Rhenium is also used in the superalloys, such as CMSX-4 (2nd gen) and CMSX-10 (3rd gen) that are used in industrial gas turbine engines like the GE 7FA. Rhenium can cause superalloys to become microstructurally unstable, forming undesirable TCP (topologically close packed) phases. In 4th and 5th generation superalloys, ruthenium is used to avoid this effect. Among others the new superalloys are EPM-102 (with 3% Ru) and TMS-162 (with 6% Ru), both containing 6% rhenium,[42] as well as TMS-138[43] and TMS-174.[44][45]

 

 

CFM International CFM56 jet engine still with blades made with 3% rhenium

For 2006, the consumption is given as 28% for General Electric, 28% Rolls-Royce plc and 12% Pratt & Whitney, all for superalloys, while the use for catalysts only accounts for 14% and the remaining applications use 18%.[38] In 2006, 77% of the rhenium consumption in the United States was in alloys.[39] The rising demand for military jet engines and the constant supply made it necessary to develop superalloys with a lower rhenium content. For example the newer CFM International CFM56 high-pressure turbine (HPT) blades will use Rene N515 with a rhenium content of 1.5% instead of Rene N5 with 3%.[46][47]

 

Rhenium improves the properties of tungsten. Tungsten-rhenium alloys are more ductile at low temperature, allowing them to be more easily machined. The high-temperature stability is also improved. The effect increases with the rhenium concentration, and therefore tungsten alloys are produced with up to 27% of Re, which is the solubility limit.[48] One application for the tungsten-rhenium alloys is X-ray sources. The high melting point of both compounds, together with the high atomic mass, makes them stable against the prolonged electron impact.[49] Rhenium tungsten alloys are also applied as thermocouples to measure temperatures up to 2200 °C.[50]

 

The high temperature stability, low vapor pressure, good wear resistance and ability to withstand arc corrosion of rhenium are useful in self-cleaning electrical contacts. In particular, the discharge occurring during the switching oxidizes the contacts. However, rhenium oxide Re2O7 has poor stability (sublimes at ~360 °C) and therefore is removed during the discharge.[38]

 

Rhenium has a high melting point and a low vapor pressure similar to tantalum and tungsten. Therefore, rhenium filaments exhibit a higher stability if the filament is operated not in vacuum, but in oxygen-containing atmosphere.[51] Those filaments are widely used in mass spectrometers, in ion gauges[52] and in photoflash lamps in photography.[53]

 

Catalysts[edit]

 

Rhenium in the form of rhenium-platinum alloy is used as catalyst for catalytic reforming, which is a chemical process to convert petroleum refinery naphthas with low octane ratings into high-octane liquid products. Worldwide, 30% of catalysts used for this process contain rhenium.[54] The olefin metathesis is the other reaction for which rhenium is used as catalyst. Normally Re2O7 on alumina is used for this process.[55] Rhenium catalysts are very resistant to chemical poisoning from nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus, and so are used in certain kinds of hydrogenation reactions

Rhenium blades pano

Rhenium